Author: Amanda

UX

Minimum Viable Kitchen


In the last two weeks I have gone to Nashville to give a talk to PhD history students; wrangled interviews for several jobs (I’m looking, by the way); and moved. Though I’d like to write about any and all of these things, eventually, I’m only going to write about the last one, because a) it’s

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design process

History as User Experience (And Other Tech Things)


Featured image by Marsyas, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. UPDATE: I tried this pitch on an actual UX employer. I’ve added some material below on how that went. Talking to liberal arts folks and employers alike, I keep coming back to some the same disturbing fact about humanities: employers aren’t seeing the connection between humanities research and anything

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code

Git and Node in a Chromebook, Without Crouton and Linux


Note: I don’t post a lot about technical things, but since I wrote this to remind myself how to get out of trouble, I may as well post it in case anyone else has the same problems. I recently bought a Toshiba Chromebook. My laptop died, and I didn’t feel like giving Apple $1000+ right

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design process

When The Tools Don’t Reflect The Material We Build With


I’ve been reviewing UX fundamentals this month, which meant (per Lynda.com’s recommedation) checking in with Photoshop, Illustrator, and Sketch. Now, I find great value in struggling with a tool that isn’t in your wheelhouse; it reminds you, among other things to be humble. So I soldiered on, and learned some useful things. But apart from

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applied academics

“There is No Lit Review!”: Applying Academic Skills in UX


On Friday, I attended a panel on applying anthropology to UX, part of the Texas Applied Anthropology Summit. I hoped to see some examples of how an academic discipline could be integrated into technology, and I was not disappointed. The summit’s organizer, Reyda Taylor, is an Anthropology PhD turned research consultant, and in her opening remarks, she noted that

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